Roxwear

‘Episode 3: Redefining youth from post-Soviet Asia / Lookbook’

by: Ainsley Hutchence

19 photographs.
Wardrobe: Roxwear / Photographer: Damir Vtow / Photographer: Artem Kim / Art director: Roxana Nassenov / Art director: Lev Tarikov / Model: Zoya Grigorenko
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Roxwear ‘Episode 3: Redefining youth from post-Soviet Asia / Lookbook’

SHOP COLLECTION

Episode 3 of Roxwear digs deeper into the cultural phenomena of Central Asia, exploring the indigenous patterns, combining nomadic heritage with brutalist legacy. The collection is filled with bright colours, daring prints & bold shapes: all signifying the opulence of thought & destitute opportunities. Logically it is split into 3 parts – ‘inspiration’, ‘despair’ & ‘reality’.

Tajik floral print dresses & traditional Kazakh patterns grace the sleek cut t-shirts, calling out to freedom of spirit and thought. Neon green denim pieces light up any room, demanding attention to the brightness of youth. The print of scantily clad women wearing traditional Kazakh headwear was planned as a tongue-in-cheek piece, but more on that later.

Print of the iconic Soviet concrete fences, crumbling, abundantly, in any corner of the post-soviet dystopia, signifies the relentless mentality that has seeped deep into the core of our DNA. The neon signs print translates – “open” and “wholesale and retail”, messages on signs typically found in corner shops the youth gravitate to at night. An actual carpet, that has long been a staple of décor of a frozen in time Krushchev-era apartment, has been repurposed into accessories – a bra and a belt.

The ‘reality’ uses one part inspiration, one part despair, & a dash of irony, to mix a bittersweet cocktail of ambivalence. “Maskara” – shame in Kazakh, a widespread word used for oppression, is the title of a t-shirt that portrays an obedient wife, rotting inside, pouring whiskey as she’s told. Korpe-skirt remixes the traditional Kazakh blanket in neon print & gives it a new purpose. The traditional Kazakh prints have been glitched out and faded to create utilitarian workwear. Neon sign embroidery give the vulgar liquor shop atmosphere an element of chic. All the elements are mixed and matched in myriad of combinations, each providing a unique flavour of the Central Asia today.

The print of pin-up Kazakh girls has proven itself to be provocative – it got us banned from multiple printshops around the city, who took it upon themselves to uphold the public morality standards by censoring expression, only strengthening the message that this collection carries.

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